The 3 Cs for Choosing a Timeless Roof Style

By Don Kilcoyne 03-08-2018
QUICK SHARE
Tag Icon

Imagine committing to a specific haircut for the next 20 to 30 years. Or a particular model of car. Or limiting yourself to eating at one restaurant. Would you ever agree to that? Of course not.

Yet that's similar to what happens when a homeowner buys a new roof. They pick one color and one roof style — one "flavor" of roof — that will influence the appearance of their home for many years. Of course, that's a small price to pay for the protection of a great roof. A well-installed, high-quality roofing system is simply too durable — and too expensive — to replace just because you want to try something new.

So when it comes time to buy YOUR new roof, you'll need to consider lots of factors, including materials, contractors, warranties, integrated solar, and more. And once you've made those decisions, be sure to take the time to choose a style and color that reflect your taste, your home's architecture, and the look and feel of your neighborhood.

Follow these three Cs to choose the roof style and color that will suit your home for years to come:

1. Communicate

Before making any roof style decisions, find out if there are any rules about the kind of roof you can install. For instance, some complexes and homeowners' associations have rules about color and style. Even if you're not in a complex or association, it may be a good idea to touch base with your neighbors and explore whether you want your roof choice to complement the neighborhood look, or to stand out with alternative shingle styles and colors that make your home unique.

2. Complement

Your shingle style and color should work with all of the other style elements of your home. For instance, does your home have bricks or siding? Is it painted — and if so, what color? Is it a rustic design that might call for a rugged wood-shake shingle or a modern design that coordinates well with a clean, bold color statement? Remember, the roof that looks great on a Victorian might not work on a sprawling ranch.

3. Compare

Great information on hundreds of roof styles and color options are as close as this blog post! In fact, you can start your research by visiting the GAF Style Guide, which is designed to help you find color and style inspiration. Then head over to the GAF Virtual Home Remodeler where you can upload a photo of your own home, and compare different combinations of roof, siding, and window solutions. Finally, be sure to look at physical shingle samples, as well. You can find them at home improvement retailers, or you can ask your roofing contractor.

Speaking of contractors, you can always find a local GAF Factory-Certified contractor.*

Now that you've learned about the three Cs of roof style, here's one more C to think about: Curb Appeal. If you plan to remain in your home, choose a roof that uniquely reflects you. But if you plan on selling, your roof can make up 40% of your home's curb appeal. You might consider choosing a more neutral color that would appeal to more prospective buyers.


*Contractors enrolled in GAF certification programs are not employees or agents of GAF, and GAF does not control or otherwise supervise these independent businesses. Contractors may have agreed that they will use GAF roofing products, and may receive benefits, such as loyalty rewards points and discounts on marketing tools from GAF for participating in the program.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Don Kilcoyne, a writer and editor for GAF, crafts marketing campaigns and language that communicate the company brand, initiatives, products, and priorities in video, print, and social media, as well as GAF Roof Views. He joined the GAF team in late 2016, bringing a background as a creative director and author.
Don't miss another GAF RoofViews post!
LATEST UPDATES
Construction planning through to completion can be tricky to coordinate, especially within an urban area, which can present a range of complications. Building proximity, tall building heights, complex building structures, and densely populated areas are just a few challenges that can make it particularly difficult to consider traditionally heavy or large-sized materials when roofing or re-roofing a building.
When it comes to commercial roofing, the options are plentiful—but not every option is suited for every building. Each building has unique needs that factor into which types of roofing may be suitable for a given project. Here is an overview of what goes into a commercial roof as well as the material options available.
Unclear about how to pay for a new roof replacement? This simple guide can help you break down the basics of new roof financing. What Is Financing? "Financing provides purchasing power," says Jeanne Lin, Vice President of Consumer Finance and Payments at GAF. "Homeowners can get the best possible roof for their needs, upgrade to a higher-grade shingle, and keep monthly payments at an affordable level."
Well-placed shingle nails are crucial for building top-performing roofs. When roofing nails are positioned improperly or driven incorrectly, the roofing system may become vulnerable to issues, such as punctures, buckling, sealing failures, blow-offs, and raised tabs. Ultimately, improperly installed nails result in lost time, lost labor, material waste, and callbacks for roofers.
Concrete decks are one of the more common types of low-slope roof decks for commercial buildings. Steel and wood roof decks are the other most common types. Concrete roof decks make up approximately 13-14% of the new and retrofit low-slope construction market, according to the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) 2015-2016 Market Survey. This article examines the advantages of concrete roof decks, the various types, and some of the precautions that should be taken to ensure success.
Is your community ready for emergencies? National Preparedness Month empowers "American people to prepare for, respond to, and mitigate emergencies, including natural and man-made disasters." As a roofing contractor, business leader, and member of your community, you're uniquely qualified to take part.
This blog contains information created by a variety of sources, including internal and third party writers. The opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of GAF. The content is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

Interested in sharing or republishing our content? We kindly ask you to adhere to our guidelines.