The Power of Cold Canvassing

By Satta Sarmah Hightower 08-28-2020
QUICK SHARE
Tag Icon

Sometimes success requires hitting the pavement—literally.

This is especially true when you're running your own contracting business. Even in the digital age, door-to-door canvassing remains effective. Canvassing allows you to get out into the community, meet people, share your story, and understand how you can help homeowners solve some of the challenges they face.

Cold canvassing may seem intimidating, but it's an art you can master with some time and practice.

The Benefits of Door-to-Door Canvassing

So, why bother with cold canvassing in the age of the internet? Because speaking to someone face-to-face can build trust, even during a short interaction.

Replacing a roof or remodeling a home is a big, expensive decision, and homeowners want to hire people they know they can trust. Door-to-door canvassing allows you to have an in-person conversation about the value your company offers while also giving homeowners knowledge they can use to make an informed purchase. Most importantly, it helps homeowners associate a friendly face with your business.

"People buy from friends. They don't buy from strangers," says Jake Strotman, owner of American Home Tech, a GAF Master Elite® Contractor.* Strotman has built a successful company over the last six years with door-to-door canvassing, and he has a wealth of tips to offer on how to canvass successfully.

Tips for Successful Canvassing

Being an effective door-to-door canvasser takes a willingness to learn and a strong work ethic, Strotman says.

It's also important to have a positive attitude and a tenacious spirit because some homeowners may not respond kindly to an unexpected visit from a salesperson. Others may not make a purchase even after you've spent an hour or more trying to convince them.

Strotman says you can't carry any of that frustration on to the next door. Instead, treat every customer interaction as a new opportunity to put forward "the best version of yourself."

To improve your chances a little, Strotman uses a strategy called "Five Steps to a Conversation" to make canvassing more effective:

  1. Deliver a creative introduction: This should be fun, but not off-putting, and should engage a homeowner within the first five seconds.
  2. Share a short story: Tell the "story" of your company in a memorable way to let the homeowner know who you are and why you're there.
  3. Give your sales presentation: Provide two to three quick facts about what your company can offer. "The sales pitch I use is really that short and it's really that simple," Strotman says. "You never really close anybody the first time, but it gets the customer to engage in talking with you."
  4. Close the deal: If they seem interested or give positive feedback, schedule a follow-up appointment.
  5. Rehash: If you do receive a yes, the work doesn't stop there. You can rehash the conversation and try to receive an additional yes by either upselling your services or getting a referral. Some homeowners may need additional contracting work, while others may have neighbors, friends, or family members who need a new roof.

These fives steps can help you give every customer your best pitch every time, increasing your chances of having a successful visit.

The Probability Behind Successful Canvassing

Canvassing may feel like a shot in the dark, but Strotman says it's "really just a numbers game."

"Ninety percent of what we do is no, and 10 percent is yes," Strotman says. "What I love about canvassing is that it's just numbers. I know how many doors I need my guys to knock on every day for them to have success."

It's expected that only a small percentage of homeowners will actually be interested in your services, but knowing that means you can better plan how many doors you'll knock on. Thinking of canvassing as a numbers game can help you canvass more strategically while also lessening the sting of rejection.

Strotman encourages his employees to seek two "no"s and a "go," which means getting two rejections from a homeowner before leaving the property. With canvassing, the more doors you knock on, the more "no"s you'll likely get—but that will just bring you one step closer to getting the "yes" you need to land a sale.

To learn more about American Home Tech, you can follow them on Facebook and Instagram.


*Contractors enrolled in GAF certification programs are not employees or agents of GAF, and GAF does not control or otherwise supervise these independent businesses. Contractors may receive benefits, such as loyalty rewards points and discounts on marketing tools from GAF for participating in the program and offering GAF enhanced warranties, which require the use of a minimum amount of GAF products.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Satta Sarmah Hightower is a freelance writer who covers business, healthcare and technology topics for a wide range of brands and publications. A former journalist, Satta holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Boston University and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School.
LATEST UPDATES
A built up roof system is a popular choice for buildings with low-slope or flat roofs. Often referred to by the acronym BUR, this system has been used for 100-plus years in the U.S. What makes BUR systems so popular? They are known for providing excellent protection due to their redundant nature because they are made up of multiple layers of ply sheets and asphalt. These layers are then topped off by a cap sheet or a flood coat of asphalt and granules. The multiple plies provide resistance to weather and heavy-duty protection for the building.
I know, taxes are boring. But let's face it: for many property management businesses – both big and small – our tax bill represents one of our most significant expenses. The smartest executives I know don't make their decisions solely based on taxes. But they do take into consideration the tax effect of any significant investment or expenditure before making them.
Ventilation for steep-slope roof assemblies is often misunderstood. One must not only understand the code requirements, but be able to translate them into real-world installations. Building codes have requirements for ventilation of steep-slope attics and enclosed rafter spaces. Balanced ventilation — nearly equal amounts of intake and exhaust — typcially provides efficient ventilation. Transitions between low-slope and steep-slope roof areas require more distinct intake and exhaust details than traditional eaves/soffits and ridges.
This article was translated from its original version written by Wendy Helfenbaum and is available in English here.Cuando sus compañeros se refieren a usted como El Maestro, sabe que su carrera ha tenido un impacto. Erasmo "Mitos" Fuentes: un maestro, colocador de techos, propietario de un negocio y capacitador de CARE de GAF, lidera con el ejemplo y representa todo lo que es posible cuando usted trabaja arduamente y apunta alto.
Silicone roof coatings are known for their ability to provide excellent UV, water, and weathering resistance. This can make them a great choice for many low-slope roofs.Here's a look at the strengths of silicone roof coatings and the use cases they're best suited for.
Thermal insulation is an important part of commercial roofing assemblies. The aim of this article is to examine the factors influencing the thermal resistance, known as R-value of polyiso. The prediction of long term R-value and the influence of climate, i.e. temperature, have been of significant interest over the past few decades as building energy budgets have increased in importance. Recent discussions as to what R-value the designer should use and the importance of ambient temperature are reviewed and discussed.
This blog contains information created by a variety of sources, including internal and third party writers. The opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of GAF. The content is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

Interested in sharing or republishing our content? We kindly ask you to adhere to our guidelines.