Best Use Cases for Silicone Roof Coatings

By Karen L Edwards 10-08-2020
QUICK SHARE
Tag Icon

Silicone roof coatings are known for their ability to provide excellent UV, water, and weathering resistance. This can make them a great choice for many low-slope roofs.

Here's a look at the strengths of silicone roof coatings and the use cases they're best suited for.

The Benefits of Silicone Roof Coatings

Silicones are high-performing polymers that can be found in many consumer products, paints, and coatings. Silicone-based roof coatings are a popular choice for low-slope roofs because they:

  • Are stable at a wide range of temperatures
  • Help protect against leaks caused by ponding water
  • Provide resistance to biological growth like algae and mold
  • Adhere well to many different substrates
  • Can provide a reflective coating if white or light colors are selected

Types of Silicone Roof Coatings

Silicone roof coatings are available in a few different formulations, including formulations with high solids.

High solids coatings have fewer solvents in their formulation, meaning the product will experience less evaporation during installation. It might be slightly more expensive than other formulations, but because of the high solid formulation, you'll probably use less product overall to achieve your desired dry mil thickness.

Solvent-based silicone coatings may be desirable because the incorporation of solvent in the formulation can result in faster drying times than water-based coatings. They can also be stored and applied at lower temperatures without risk of freezing. However, the solvents are highly volatile, so care must be taken to keep vapors away from sparks or flames to avoid combustion. Solvents can also be odorous, so additional steps may be required to ensure the safety of workers and building occupants. it is important to close building air intakes during installation.

Use Cases for Silicone Roof Coatings

High Solids Coatings

High solids coatings may be a suitable choice for low-slope roofs in high-moisture areas. The coating will perform well even in roof areas that are subject to ponding water.

High solids silicone coatings can also be installed with minimal disruption to building occupants. With low VOC content, they could be an ideal choice for high-occupancy buildings like healthcare facilities, nursing care facilities, daycare centers, and schools.

High solids silicones can be used over many types of existing roofs, including metal, structural concrete, single-ply membranes, and asphalt roofs. They are also a good fit for installing over polyurethane foam on new or existing roofs.

Solvent-Based Coatings

Solvent-based silicone coatings also perform well in areas where high moisture and humidity are present. The evaporation rate of the solvents is not affected by the amount of moisture in the air.

Solvent-based coatings are a versatile option because they can be installed in temperatures ranging from 40 degrees Fahrenheit (4.44 °C) to 110 degrees Fahrenheit (43.33 °C). They also enable flexibility in their application method, allowing for use of a brush, roller, or sprayer.

When to Consider Other Coating Types

Keep in mind that silicone coatings, whether solvent-based or high solids, form a slick surface that might not be suitable for roofs with high foot traffic. They do not resist dirt pickup as well as other types of coatings and may require cleaning to maintain reflective properties.

If you are unsure which type of roof coating will be the right fit for your roofing project, GAF can point you in the right direction. Or, you can learn more about the roof coating options available to you.

Don't miss another GAF RoofViews post!
LATEST UPDATES
Part of being a successful roofing business owner involves figuring out how to get the word out about your company so that when homeowners need a new roof, they can easily find you. This means finding the right advertising formats and channels—whether that's organic, unpaid advertising such as an email campaign or a company blog, or a paid marketing plan that includes buying print space or investing in paid search strategy.
With nine out of 10 Americans using email, it's a great way for contractors to reach and engage with potential customers.Email can help your business generate qualified leads that could turn into customers—but shooting off random marketing emails could repel potential customers rather than attract them. That's why your business needs a lead nurturing strategy. A thoughtful strategy will allow you to engage prospects with relevant messages that encourage them to seek out your services or schedule a consultation for a roofing estimate.
If your goal is to drive interest in your roofing business through marketing, consider that 59% of respondents in a recent survey said email marketing influences their purchase decisions. On top of that, 78% of marketers saw an increase in email engagement over the course of 2019.
What are the key material properties?In a previous article the use of thermal inertia to slow down heat flux through a roof assembly was discussed. In buildings where air conditioning costs dominate and heating use is relatively low, higher thermal inertia assemblies can potentially improve energy efficiency. This is particularly the case of buildings such as offices that are only occupied during daylight hours. Thermal inertia could delay the transmission of heat into a building towards the end of the day, increasing thermal comfort and allowing facility managers to reduce cooling during the day.
COVID-19 has wreaked havoc on many businesses, including roofing companies. A study by the Society for Human Resource Management revealed that 62% of small businesses have seen drops in revenues since the pandemic began. Using roofing marketing to increase your customer base has never been more important.
My whole career has been focused on innovation, on developing and delivering exciting new technologies and products. That's led me to also devote considerable time and energy to thinking about—and working to build—organizational cultures that foster truly transformational innovation. Along the way I've learned a few things.
This blog contains information created by a variety of sources, including internal and third party writers. The opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of GAF. The content is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

Interested in sharing or republishing our content? We kindly ask you to adhere to our guidelines.