Roof Damage from Hail? Here's What to Do Next

By Annie Crawford 08-18-2020
QUICK SHARE
Tag Icon

Have you experienced roof damage from hail? With 5,392 recorded hail storms in 2019, it's possible some of these heavy-hitting ice balls have impacted your property recently or in the past.

Hail storms and high winds can damage your roof. Know how to identify hail damage and what steps to take after hail hits.

How to Identify Damage to Your Roof

After a hail storm, you'll want to take quick action to see if there's any roof damage from hail. When it's safe to go outside, grab your camera and take snapshots of any remaining hail balls. These photos can be helpful if you end up filing an insurance claim. You can use a tape measure to show hail size.

Next, it's time to search for any visible hail damage from inside and around your home. Be sure to take pictures of any hail damage you see. Start inside your attic, then walk around the exterior of your house, and finally, use binoculars to view your roof. Leave it to the pros to climb on your roof as it can be dangerous to do so yourself.

Inside the House

A walk through the house may reveal signs of hail damage. Look for issues such as:

  • Dents or cracks in skylights
  • Visible damage in the attic ceiling, such as cracks in plywood, wet spots, or sagging

Outside the House

Inspect your home's exterior to help gauge what might be happening on your roof. For example, if your siding is damaged from hail, there's a good chance your roof suffered too. Look for trouble spots like:

  • Dents in gutters or downspouts
  • Dents in siding or window sills
  • Damage to the air conditioner
  • Hail damage to your deck

Ground View of Roof

Climbing up on a slippery, post-storm roof without the proper safety equipment can lead to accidents. That's why rooftop inspections are best left to the pros, especially after hail hits. Instead, use binoculars to inspect your roof from the ground. Look for visible signs of hail damage such as:

  • Dings or dents in roofing vents
  • Variation in shingle colors that look like bruising—this may be due to granule loss caused by hail. Granule loss is more than a cosmetic issue, as it can lead to premature shingle aging.
  • Visible indentations in shingles or areas where the granules look scuffed/removed
  • Missing, loose, or cracked shingles
  • Bent or detached flashing

Take Action Around Hail Damage

If you suspect you may have roof damage, contact a roofing contractor to provide a roof inspection. Remember, not all hail damage is visible.

If you have reason to suspect hail damage but can't see any major problems, consider enlisting the help of a professional contractor to identify latent damage.

Find a local GAF-factory certified roofing contractor* to come out to assess the extent of the damage for you.

Insurance Claims

Many insurance companies provide coverage for hail damage to your roof. Review your policy to understand your coverage, restrictions, and deductible. If you plan to file a claim with your insurance company, it's important to contact the company promptly and follow their procedure for filing a claim.

Keep Your Roof Damage-Free

In need of reliable hail storm information? Visit Through the Storm, a helpful resource hub for homeowners impacted by a storm. You can use the Handy Steps to Storm Restoration guide to ensure you take appropriate steps to repair the damage and protect your home.


*Contractors enrolled in GAF certification programs are not employees or agents of GAF, and GAF does not control or otherwise supervise these independent businesses. Contractors may receive benefits, such as loyalty rewards points and discounts on marketing tools from GAF for participating in the program and offering GAF enhanced warranties, which require the use of a minimum amount of GAF products.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Annie Crawford is a freelance writer in Oakland, CA, covering travel, style, and home improvement. Find more of her work at annielcrawford.com.
LATEST UPDATES
If the need for a roof repair has caught you off-guard, you're not alone. More than 50% of American homeowners dealt with emergency home repairs in 2019. The good news is, between homeowners insurance and payment plans, you may be able to turn that emergency into an investment in your home's value and beauty.
Shirley Mejia, Owner of Premier Home Renovations, shares how her dad inspired her to get into the roofing industry and how hard work always pays off. For tools and resources that can support your business goals, visit GAF's contractor resources.
Understanding your attic ventilation options can lead to higher quality roof system installations, which in turn boosts your business and helps keep your customers happy. Sounds like an all-around win, right? Fortunately, installing the right attic ventilation options can be a bit simpler when you know how to calculate the proper amount of ventilation and choose the right products for the job.
We've all struggled, to one degree or another, to stay productive during the coronavirus pandemic. For example, when I drove away from GAF Headquarters in mid-March, I expected to work from home for, at most, a few weeks. As those weeks stretched into months, my co-workers and I have used digital tools to stay connected and productive.
A built up roof system is a popular choice for buildings with low-slope or flat roofs. Often referred to by the acronym BUR, this system has been used for 100-plus years in the U.S. What makes BUR systems so popular? They are known for providing excellent protection due to their redundant nature because they are made up of multiple layers of ply sheets and asphalt. These layers are then topped off by a cap sheet or a flood coat of asphalt and granules. The multiple plies provide resistance to weather and heavy-duty protection for the building.
If you've been putting off your roof repair or replacement because you're not ready for a big upfront expense, you may want to consider a payment plan. Many homeowners use the power of financing to pay in manageable installments over time rather than all at once.
This blog contains information created by a variety of sources, including internal and third party writers. The opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of GAF. The content is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

Interested in sharing or republishing our content? We kindly ask you to adhere to our guidelines.