4 Homeowner Tips for Choosing a Shingle Color

By Liza Barth 11-03-2016
QUICK SHARE
Tag Icon

Homeowners don't buy roofs often, so choosing the right shingle color is very important. The shingle color has to work with your house and style, complement the neighborhood, and take into consideration any other preferences you may have. Here are some tips to consider the best possible color for your next roof.

  1. Match to your house. Take a look at your house's style—do you have bricks or siding? Is your home painted? Is the style traditional or modern? Take a look at the GAF Style Guide to get inspiration and ideas for colors that match a variety of styles.
  2. Think about curb appeal. Whether you are staying in your home long-term or plan on selling in a few years, a neutral color will keep your house looking current. You can also distinguish your house by using more striking colors. Either of these options can increase your home's curb appeal, which can increase the value of your home
  3. Talk to your neighbors. If you live in a complex run by an association, make sure there aren't any rules for choosing a shingle color. Some associations like all homes to look the same. If you're not in a complex, consider your neighbors and what they have on their roofs. If you like your neighbors' roofs, find out more about similar shingle colors and styles and how they may complement your home. If you want to be a little different and stand out from your neighbors, explore alternative shingle styles and colors that will make your home unique.
  4. Do your research. Get some samples and look at online tools like the GAF Virtual Home Remodeler to see which color shingle would look best with your home. Also, consider the architectural style of your home. What may look good on a Ranch-style house may not work for a Tutor or Colonial. Drive through different neighborhoods to get ideas and see examples.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Liza Barth is a former content editor & writer for GAF Roofing.
Don't miss another GAF RoofViews post!
LATEST UPDATES
Upcoming roofing project? Prepare like a pro using this checklist to ensure that every detail is in order before the roofers start work. Read on to learn more about how to plan for a new roof and what steps to take to make sure the interior and exterior of your home are protected during the project, plus topics to discuss with your contractor before and after to make sure the project goes off without a hitch.
Construction planning through to completion can be tricky to coordinate, especially within an urban area, which can present a range of complications. Building proximity, tall building heights, complex building structures, and densely populated areas are just a few challenges that can make it particularly difficult to consider traditionally heavy or large-sized materials when roofing or re-roofing a building.
When it comes to commercial roofing, the options are plentiful—but not every option is suited for every building. Each building has unique needs that factor into which types of roofing may be suitable for a given project. Here is an overview of what goes into a commercial roof as well as the material options available.
Unclear about how to pay for a new roof replacement? This simple guide can help you break down the basics of new roof financing. What Is Financing? "Financing provides purchasing power," says Jeanne Lin, Vice President of Consumer Finance and Payments at GAF. "Homeowners can get the best possible roof for their needs, upgrade to a higher-grade shingle, and keep monthly payments at an affordable level."
Well-placed shingle nails are crucial for building top-performing roofs. When roofing nails are positioned improperly or driven incorrectly, the roofing system may become vulnerable to issues, such as punctures, buckling, sealing failures, blow-offs, and raised tabs. Ultimately, improperly installed nails result in lost time, lost labor, material waste, and callbacks for roofers.
Concrete decks are one of the more common types of low-slope roof decks for commercial buildings. Steel and wood roof decks are the other most common types. Concrete roof decks make up approximately 13-14% of the new and retrofit low-slope construction market, according to the National Roofing Contractors Association (NRCA) 2015-2016 Market Survey. This article examines the advantages of concrete roof decks, the various types, and some of the precautions that should be taken to ensure success.
This blog contains information created by a variety of sources, including internal and third party writers. The opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of GAF. The content is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

Interested in sharing or republishing our content? We kindly ask you to adhere to our guidelines.