4 Homeowner Tips for Choosing a Shingle Color

By Liza Barth 11-03-2016
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Homeowners don't buy roofs often, so choosing the right shingle color is very important. The shingle color has to work with your house and style, complement the neighborhood, and take into consideration any other preferences you may have. Here are some tips to consider the best possible color for your next roof.

  1. Match to your house. Take a look at your house's style—do you have bricks or siding? Is your home painted? Is the style traditional or modern? Take a look at the GAF Style Guide to get inspiration and ideas for colors that match a variety of styles.
  2. Think about curb appeal. Whether you are staying in your home long-term or plan on selling in a few years, a neutral color will keep your house looking current. You can also distinguish your house by using more striking colors. Either of these options can increase your home's curb appeal, which can increase the value of your home
  3. Talk to your neighbors. If you live in a complex run by an association, make sure there aren't any rules for choosing a shingle color. Some associations like all homes to look the same. If you're not in a complex, consider your neighbors and what they have on their roofs. If you like your neighbors' roofs, find out more about similar shingle colors and styles and how they may complement your home. If you want to be a little different and stand out from your neighbors, explore alternative shingle styles and colors that will make your home unique.
  4. Do your research. Get some samples and look at online tools like the GAF Virtual Home Remodeler to see which color shingle would look best with your home. Also, consider the architectural style of your home. What may look good on a Ranch-style house may not work for a Tutor or Colonial. Drive through different neighborhoods to get ideas and see examples.
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Liza Barth is a former content editor & writer for GAF Roofing.
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