How Good360 and GAF Help Families Rebuild After Natural Disasters

By Satta Sarmah Hightower 07-10-2020
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Corporate giving has changed and evolved over the past decade. Many companies donate money to support worthwhile causes, but increasingly, companies are focusing their efforts to make a difference by leveraging their expertise and sharing their products directly with those in need.

That's what GAF is doing through its partnership with Good360. Good360, the global leader in product philanthropy and purposeful giving, helps companies do good by distributing highly needed product donations to people facing challenging life circumstances. GAF has worked with the organization to donate $2 million worth of roofing products to vulnerable families in need, and their impact is still growing. Together, GAF and Good360 are transforming lives and communities across the country.

Giving Back after Disaster

Good360 delivers the right products at the right time to people affected by all phases of disasters by partnering with local nonprofits and other organizations. With the tagline "Goods for the Greater Good," Good360 has distributed over $9 billion in products during its 35+ year history. More than 400 corporate partners have provided essential products to Good360 during that time, and more than 90,000 nonprofit members have registered and been approved to distribute these products. Recently, Good360 connected J. Crew with Connecticut nonprofit Brass City Cares for a community clothing drive, and it organized backpack and lunch box donations from Williams Sonoma for a South Carolina church to distribute to Hurricane Dorian survivors.

By partnering with Good360, GAF has developed ongoing relationships with nonprofits that have helped give thousands of natural disaster survivors the ability to go home again.

Giving Beyond Dollars

In 2019 alone, GAF provided 56 truckloads of roofing materials that were distributed to 20 Good360 nonprofit partners. These materials were used to roof more than 600 properties—creating a lasting impact for the people who now live in them.

GAF's work with Good360 has helped communities rebuild after natural disasters like Hurricanes Harvey and Michael. West Street Recovery, a Houston nonprofit, used GAF shingles to help five Texas families rebuild their homes. Among those assisted was Margarita, a community builder and long-time West Street Recovery volunteer who, after Hurricane Harvey, found herself in desperate need of the same help she had given to so many others. A donation from GAF gave her and her family the materials for a new roof, empowering her community to help her rebuild when she needed it most.

GAF donations also have helped survivors rebuild after Hurricane Michael. Santa Nieves, a retiree in Jackson County, Florida, was able to finally finish construction on her home after it suffered fire and flood damage. The donated materials also made Santa's home more structurally sound, strengthening it against future hurricanes.

In addition to hurricane and fire damage, communities affected by tornadoes have been supported by GAF, Good360, and their community partners. GAF donations helped 75 families rebuild after a tornado struck Lanett, Alabama. The Chattahoochee Fuller Center, which provides affordable housing to local families, used donated roofing materials to rebuild 17 homes—and counting. This donation made a huge difference for the Rivera sisters, who had lost not only all their belongings but also their mother during the disaster. Thanks to the donation, the sisters were able to move into a new home and begin to heal after their devastating loss.

"The partnership between Good360 and GAF has already made a difference in so many lives," said Matt Connelly, CEO of Good360. "By donating roofing materials and shingles, GAF is helping communities find shelter after natural disasters. But GAF and Good360 are doing more than just giving families a literal roof over their heads. We're doing something even more important—giving them hope for a better future."

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Satta Sarmah Hightower is a freelance writer who covers business, healthcare and technology topics for a wide range of brands and publications. A former journalist, Satta holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Boston University and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School.
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