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With the misinformation swirling around the topic of moisture in concrete roof decks, it can be difficult to know the right approach to take to mitigate risk. Are roof failures due to moisture in concrete primarily found in lightweight concrete decks? Do vented decks alleviate moisture in concrete by facilitating downward drying? Is 28 days the right amount of time to let a new concrete deck cure? Are admixtures and MVRA's (Moisture Vapor Reduction Additives) effective in mitigating concerns around moisture in concrete roof decks? Are vapor retarders the answer? What about vented base sheets? What adhesives and insulation and cover board facers are appropriate to use in these roof assemblies?
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With the misinformation swirling around the topic of moisture in concrete roof decks, it can be difficult to know the right approach to take to mitigate risk. Are roof failures due to moisture in concrete primarily found in lightweight concrete decks? Do vented decks alleviate moisture in concrete by facilitating downward drying? Is 28 days the right amount of time to let a new concrete deck cure? Are admixtures and MVRA's (Moisture Vapor Reduction Additives) effective in mitigating concerns around moisture in concrete roof decks? Are vapor retarders the answer? What about vented base sheets? What adhesives and insulation and cover board facers are appropriate to use in these roof assemblies?
Can Energy Efficiency be Further Improved? The energy efficiency of a building's enclosure is generally analyzed in terms of thermal resistance. This is a static property and doesn't take into account the time of day and the effects of thermal mass. This article shows how adding thermal mass to a roof assembly might offer a way to improve energy efficiency, especially for buildings only occupied during daylight hours such as offices and schools. In addition, thermal mass could help reduce electric grid demand swings.
A common question being asked in the roofing industry is whether or not the 2016 version of ASCE 7 is going to increase the design wind pressures acting on a building. The answer is "yes" in many cases. So, the follow up question is "by how much?" And, that leads to the next question, "how much more capacity will roof systems be required to have when wind design follows ASCE 7-16?"
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A common question being asked in the roofing industry is whether or not the 2016 version of ASCE 7 is going to increase the design wind pressures acting on a building. The answer is "yes" in many cases. So, the follow up question is "by how much?" And, that leads to the next question, "how much more capacity will roof systems be required to have when wind design follows ASCE 7-16?"
What are the key material properties?In a previous article the use of thermal inertia to slow down heat flux through a roof assembly was discussed. In buildings where air conditioning costs dominate and heating use is relatively low, higher thermal inertia assemblies can potentially improve energy efficiency. This is particularly the case of buildings such as offices that are only occupied during daylight hours. Thermal inertia could delay the transmission of heat into a building towards the end of the day, increasing thermal comfort and allowing facility managers to reduce cooling during the day.
Thermal insulation is an important part of commercial roofing assemblies. As with anything, there are ways to design with and install polyiso insulation — a better way, a best way, and many variations in-between! What may be best in terms of lowest up-front costs, may prove only good or worse over the long-term life of the building.
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VIDEOS FROM GAF
VIDEO ARTICLE
Air Barrier vs. Vapor RetarderWelcome to Episode 4 of The Building Science FAQ series.The Building Science FAQ video series explores some of the technical questions that crop up when specifying a low-slope roof.
VIDEO ARTICLE
Air Barrier vs. Vapor RetarderWelcome to Episode 4 of The Building Science FAQ series.The Building Science FAQ video series explores some of the technical questions that crop up when specifying a low-slope roof.
VIDEO ARTICLE
Air Barrier vs. Vapor RetarderWelcome to Episode 4 of The Building Science FAQ series.The Building Science FAQ video series explores some of the technical questions that crop up when specifying a low-slope roof.
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