Life After COVID-19: How to Resume Your Business and Safely Get Back to Work

By Satta Sarmah Hightower 09-29-2020
QUICK SHARE
Tag Icon

Many states are beginning to fully or partially reopen after COVID-19 brought the economy to a halt. However, if you're ready to get back to work and begin serving customers again, there are several guidelines you need to consider to keep yourself, your employees, and your customers safe.

Here are some suggestions for how to resume business as safely and productively as possible:

Reconnect with Customers and Prospects

One of the first things you can do to restart your business is reach out to former leads who put their projects on hold during the pandemic.

Many customers may still be hesitant about moving forward, but you can try to reassure them by sharing your company's COVID-19 safety policies. Detail the strategies you'll follow to limit face-to-face interactions and potential exposure, such as handling all customer communications virtually.

You can also incentivize prospects by offering a special for new customers, such as a discount for certain types of projects. It might feel challenging to offer discounts if your company lost business during the shutdown, but providing some type of customer incentive could help to fill up your sales pipeline.

For previous buyers, you may want to consider adding a service and maintenance division or begin selling other verticals such as gutters, windows and siding to re-engage satisfied customers who have already experienced your work.

Prioritize Projects

Since construction is considered an essential business in many states, you may have continued working on certain roofing projects during the shutdown. However, now that the economy is beginning to reopen, you may have customers anxious to get started on projects they had put on hold—on top of the urgent repairs or replacements you already had in the pipeline.

Consider several approaches to prioritizing new or backlogged projects. First, you could prioritize customers' needs based on project requirements and deadlines. For example, if a homeowner has had major roof damage and needs to be back in their home by a certain date, you might want to start on that project first.

The project's budget is also an important consideration, especially if cash flow is an issue for your business. If a customer has a large project with a big budget, it may be good to get started on that project sooner rather than later.

In addition, staffing and resources might dictate which projects you can tackle. You may have had employees who fell sick and are recovering or employees who have moved onto other jobs after work slowed down at your company. Limited manpower could prevent you from taking on certain projects right away, so you may have to focus on smaller or fewer roofing jobs to start. Consider all these factors when you're deciding which projects to prioritize.

Keep Employees and Customers Safe

Employee and customer safety are two of the biggest considerations to think through when it comes to resuming work after COVID-19.

Many states have provided safety guidelines for the construction industry, including ensuring employees at job sites wash their hands for at least 20 seconds with soap and water, or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% ethanol or 70% isopropanol before leaving the site if handwashing isn't possible.

You should make sure employees practice social distancing both inside the office and on job sites. When and where it makes sense, you may want to allow employees to work from home. Paperwork and phone calls can all be handled virtually, so there's not a strong a need for administrative staff to be in the office all the time.

On job sites, workers should always wear masks and avoid handshaking and close personal contact as much as possible. They also should limit face-to-face meetings with customers and instead opt for virtual meetings using applications like Facetime, Google Hangouts, Skype, or Zoom. GAF offers several digital tools, like GAF QuickMeasure and GAF e360, to help you remotely take measurements and build 3D renderings from smartphone photos. Use these tools to your advantage to maintain employee and customer safety.

Getting Back to Business

Even though states are beginning to reopen, the health risks of COVID-19 haven't disappeared. It's more important than ever that your business takes steps to protect employees and customers, even while you try to deliver the best service possible.

If you are ready to get back to work, visit your state or local health department's website for more specific guidance about how to safely resume business operations. Using these resources can put you in the best position to safely and successfully run your business during this challenging time and help your company adjust to this new normal.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Satta Sarmah Hightower is a freelance writer who covers business, healthcare and technology topics for a wide range of brands and publications. A former journalist, Satta holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Boston University and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School.
Don't miss another GAF RoofViews post!
LATEST UPDATES
Hurricane Ian was the deadliest to strike Florida since the famously catastrophic 1935 Labor Day hurricane. With wind speeds that reached 150 mph, the 2022 hurricane left a trail of profound devastation—and the people caught in that trail are now fighting to rebound and rebuild. Leveraging the combined expertise and resources of GAF and Standard Logistics to assist affected locals, GAF is proud to be part of the efforts to provide relief to those who need it most.
As the winter season approaches, decorating your home with lights is a classic way to show your holiday spirit. However, there are right and wrong ways to go about this (National Lampoon's Christmas Vacation, anyone?)—and, depending on your roof, the correct ones may not always be easy to accomplish on your own. To help, here are five tips to simplify your annual holiday light installation so you can make your home merry and bright without damaging the roof — or yourself!
Architects strive to achieve a roof design that strikes a delicate balance between aesthetics and performance. Achieving high-performance means incorporating the code, warranty, and guarantee requirements that building owners must meet — among the most important factors of any construction project — into design vision. This isn't made any easier by the sheer number of roofing systems available. Even experienced architects can find it challenging to get familiar with all available components and positively identify which materials are going to deliver the ultimate protection for the building.
As Erasmo "Mitos" Fuentes — GAF CARE Team Training Lead and highly respected "Maestro" of the roofing world — will warn rookies, errors during installation can have consequences later on in the life of the roofing system. Many are minor, like small leaks. Others, though, can be much more serious, such as major (and potentially catastrophic) cracks.
A harsh storm can cause all kinds of damage to your home, especially its roof. While some roof problems are obviously visible, others aren't as simple to spot. Whether you can see them or not, fixing any issues that pop up in the aftermath of a storm helps keep your home safe from further harm. With strong storms come sharp winds, hail, and heavy rain that can damage shingles, gutters, flashing, and other areas.
About 82% of homes in the United States have outdoor living areas—many with low-slope roofs. That's nearly 6 million homes that could feature a self-adhered roofing system. Are you taking advantage of the opportunities that these porches, sheds, garages, and carports represent?
This blog contains information created by a variety of sources, including internal and third party writers. The opinions and views expressed do not necessarily represent those of GAF. The content is for informational purposes only. It is not intended to constitute financial, accounting, tax or legal advice. GAF does not guarantee the accuracy, reliability, and completeness of the information. In no event shall GAF be held responsible or liable for errors or omissions in the content or for the results, damages or losses caused by or in connection with the use of or reliance on the content.

Interested in sharing or republishing our content? We kindly ask you to adhere to our guidelines.