5 Ways to Improve Your Roofing Marketing and Build Your Brand

By Satta Sarmah Hightower 03-25-2021
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When a homeowner needs a roof replacement or repair, searching online will show them hundreds of local roofing companies.

How do you stand out in such a crowded field? It takes a strong brand identity to level up your roofing marketing. Whether you're a small or large contractor, here are some best practices for how to brand your business and attract more customers.

1. Establish a Strong Visual Identity

McDonald's golden arches. Home Depot's signature orange. The bite in Apple's iconic logo.

These brands each have a strong visual identity. Recognizable images like these are associated not just with the brands themselves but with longevity, convenience, stellar service, and innovation.

But you don't have to be a large company to create a compelling visual identity. Small, simple design elements make a serious difference. For instance, you can work with a designer or use user-friendly design software to create or update your company logo. Choose a color palette that aligns with the tone and image you want your brand to represent: a warmer color palette may convey a more friendly, approachable brand identity, while a metallic color palette with shades of silver, gold, and off-white might indicate that your roofing company caters to a higher-end clientele and specializes in roofing services for custom and luxury homes. Also look at your typography—choosing the right font is a subtle, easy way to convey professionalism.

Visuals help tell your brand story. After choosing a color palette, typography, and logo to match your message, keep those design choices consistent across various platforms and marketing efforts. Put together, these visuals create a cohesive image of your company that helps you stand out.

2. Build Your Online Presence

Successful roofing marketing often hinges on a strong online presence. A website might discuss your track record in the industry, display photos of past projects, or even host a blog where you share your roofing expertise. Creating your own website—with the help of a roofing marketing company, if you have the means—gives you an open space to share your brand story as you want to tell it. You can highlight any certifications, awards, or recognition, such as a GAF Master Elite®* Contractor designation.

If you've completed over 1,000 roofing projects, specialize in metal roofs, offer free roofing inspections, or have glowing testimonials, your website gives you the chance to highlight what differentiates your brand. Use this valuable online real estate to craft your online reputation and showcase the reasons to choose your company over another roofing contractor.

3. Use Social Media to Your Advantage

Your website isn't the only place where you can build your online presence—social media is an equally powerful tool.

Your social media should echo some of what appears on your site. Share images of past projects, home maintenance tips, and customer testimonials. You can even treat certain platforms as customer service channels, where you respond to inquiries from prospects or connect with customers to schedule a consultation.

Sites like Instagram put their focus on visually driven marketing. If you have a dedicated marketing team, they can keep followers' feeds fresh with continuous new content, from graphics and gifs to photos and videos. You can also leverage LinkedIn to create content for a more business-oriented audience. Posting regularly can attract organic leads, and running paid ad campaigns is an effective way to attract additional qualified leads.

For smaller contractors, Yelp is a great tool to build your online reputation and deliver responsive customer service. Simply ask customers to leave reviews, and respond to any unsolicited reviews posted on your page. Just be sure to claim your page first. Once you claim your page, you can upload photos, update your business information, and respond to requests for quotes.

4. Harness the Power of Collaboration

Working alongside another company can also build a strong brand. For example, you may partner with a local building, window, or gutter service to jointly market your work and offer combined discounts—say 10% off a roof repair if the customer purchases new windows from a local window company associated with your brand.

An effective partnership doesn't have to be all about driving sales, however. It may center on giving back to your community, which can build a positive brand image for your company. For example, GAF partners with several local roofing contractors to work alongside Habitat for Humanity and build affordable homes for deserving families. Many GAF-certified contractors* also lend their services after natural disasters to help communities rebuild and recover.

Collaborating can give your company a platform to build brand awareness and make meaningful connections that can drive future business—all while giving back.

5. Deliver Exceptional Customer Service

While all of these roofing marketing initiatives can strengthen a brand, your brand's strength comes from the company's work itself. One of best ways to brand your business is to deliver exceptional customer service—it's why many roofing companies rely on word-of-mouth marketing.

Treat every customer interaction, whether on a jobsite or on social media, as an opportunity to deliver great service. Customers won't recommend a business if they had a poor experience, so delivering timely, responsive service at a competitive price goes a long way toward building your business reputation and generating referrals. Great service gives customers a positive association with your brand, and it shows them that you value both their business and the trust they've placed in you to safeguard their home.

Building Your Brand with Better Roofing Marketing

Regardless of your company's size or specialty, better branding and marketing are good for business.

You have countless ways to build your brand's reputation at your fingertips. These five are only the beginning—but they lay the foundation for effective roofing marketing and a long-lasting business. You can also visit www.gaf.com/getthere for additional tools and resources to help build your your brand and business.


*Contractors enrolled in GAF certification programs are not employees or agents of GAF, and GAF does not control or otherwise supervise these independent businesses. Contractors may receive benefits, such as loyalty rewards points and discounts on marketing tools from GAF for participating in the program and offering GAF enhanced warranties, which require the use of a minimum amount of GAF products.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Satta Sarmah Hightower is a freelance writer who covers business, healthcare and technology topics for a wide range of brands and publications. A former journalist, Satta holds a bachelor's degree in journalism from Boston University and a master's degree in journalism from Northwestern University's Medill School.
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